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Another Year –by: Frances Ridley Havergal

LibriVox readers bring you 13 readings of Another Year, by Frances Ridley Havergal. This was the weekly poem for December 28, 2014, to January 3, 2015.

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Kept for the Master's Use

By Frances Ridley Havergal

Philadelphia Henry Altemus Company

Copyrighted 1895, by Henry Altemus.

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Persians –by: Aeschylus

This is one of the few Greek tragedies that deals with historical events rather than mythological ones. The elders of the Persian court await new of the outcome of the Battle of Salamis, and mourn when they find that their king, Xerxes, has lost to the Greeks.

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FOUR PLAYS OF AESCHYLUS

THE SUPPLIANT MAIDENS THE PERSIANS THE SEVEN AGAINST THEBES THE PROMETHEUS BOUND

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE BY E.D.A. MORSHEAD, MA.

INTRODUCTION

The surviving dramas of Aeschylus are seven in number, though he is believed to have written nearly a hundred during his life of ...

Dhammapada (Version 2) –by: Unknown

- A Collection of Verses Being One of the Canonical Books of the Buddhists

Dhammapada means "The path of Dharma." The Pali word Dhamma corresponds to the Sankrit word Dharma. It is a collection of the teachings of the Buddha. These verses, compiled by Buddha's students in the years following his final Nirvana, were culled from various discourses given by the Buddha in the course of forty-five years of his teaching, as he travelled in the valley of the Ganges and the sub-mountain tract of the Himalayas. These 423 verses are often terse, witty, and convincing. Whenever similes are use...

Prince (Version 4) –by: Niccol

This book is a five hundred year old manual for how to run a kingdom or principality. Written in 1513 but not published until 1532, "The Prince" generated controversy even before it got into print. Unlike the many previous "how-to" mamuals for new rulers, "The Prince" only judged actions by their effectiveness and did not consider morals or ethics at all. Some of the suggestions were so brutal and amoral that many critics in the 18th century considered "The Prince" to be a satire, as they could not believe that any philosopher would seriously promote such actions. But perhaps the real reason f...

Puck of Pook s Hill (version 2) –by: Rudyard Kipling

'Puck of Pook's Hill' is a fantasy book by Rudyard Kipling, published in 1906, containing a series of short stories set in different periods of English history. It can count both as historical fantasy – since some of the stories told of the past have clear magical elements, and as contemporary fantasy – since it depicts a magical being active and practising his magic in the England of the early 1900s when the book was written.

The stories are all narrated to two children living near Burwash, in the area of Kipling's own house Bateman's, by people magically plucked out of history...

Dubliners (Version 2) –by: James Joyce

Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences self-understanding or illumination. Many of the characters in Dublin...

Diary in America, Series One

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Diary in America Series One, by Captain Marryat.

In the late 1830s Captain Marryat, already a famous literary figure in North America, visited the United States and Canada, writing his observations in two Series of volumes, each containing three books.

These were published in Britain as the six books, but were published in America as two books with small print and thin paper, thus enabling the Diary to be published as two books only. It is from first editions of the American version that we...

Young Tom Bowling The Boys of the British Navy

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Young Tom Bowling The Boys of the British Navy

By J.C. Hutcheson This book fills a gap about just how boy seamen were trained at the end of the nineteenth century. From first to last it is very credible, and also very readable. It was not very easy to transcribe, because the boys we meet come from a variety of country places, and hence have a variety of dialects. In particular one of the boys has a strong Irish brogue, and another has an equally strong west Hampshire accent. It is this boy...

Murders in the Rue Morgue (version 2) –by: Edgar Allan Poe

"The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is a story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham's Magazine in 1841. It has been recognized as the first detective story; Poe referred to it as one of his "tales of ratiocination". C. Auguste Dupin is a man in Paris who solves the mystery of the brutal murder of two women. Numerous witnesses heard a suspect, though no one agrees on what language was spoken. At the murder scene, Dupin finds a hair that does not appear to be human. Writing the first true detective in fiction, Poe's Dupin originated many literary conventions which would be used in future fiction...

Treasure Island (version 5) –by: Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island is an adventure novel narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold". Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is a tale noted for its atmosphere, characters and action, and also as a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality -- unusual for children's literature. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perceptions of pirates is enormous, including such elements as treasure maps marked with an "X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen bearing parrots on their shoulders.

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