Page 1 of 1212345...10...Last »

Philebus

Philebus (ΦΙΛΗΒΟΣ) discusses pleasure, wisdom, soul and God.

First Page:

PHILEBUS

By Plato

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

INTRODUCTION AND ANALYSIS.

The Philebus appears to be one of the later writings of Plato, in which the style has begun to alter, and the dramatic and poetical element has become subordinate to the speculative and philosophical. In the development of abstract thought great advances have been made on the Protagoras or the Phaedrus, and even on the Republic. But there is a corresponding diminution of artistic skill, a want of character ...

Bulfinch s Mythology: the Age of Fable

First Page:

BULFINCH'S MYTHOLOGY THE AGE OF FABLE

Revised by Rev.E. E. Hale

CONTENTS

Chapter I Origin of Greeks and Romans. The Aryan Family. The Divinities of these Nations. Character of the Romans. Greek notion of the World. Dawn, Sun, and Moon. Jupiter and the gods of Olympus. Foreign gods. Latin Names. Saturn or Kronos. Titans. Juno, Vulcan, Mars, Phoebus Apollo, Venus, Cupid, Minerva, Mercury, Ceres, Bacchus. The Muses. The Graces. The Fates. The Furies. Pan. The Satyrs...

Lysistrata

Lysistrata read by the Classics Drama Company at DePaul. The Classics Drama Company at DePaul is a new gathering of Thespians and Classicists dedicated to performing and understanding ancient literature. If you live in Chicago and attend DePaul University, we welcome new additions to our group. Contact Dr. Kirk Shellko (kshellko@depaul.edu), if interested.

First performed in classical Athens c. 411 B.C.E., Aristophanes’ Lysistrata is the original battle of the sexes. One woman, Lysistrata, brings together the women of all Greece, exhorting them to withhold sexual contact...

Eryxias

Eryxias (ΕΡΥΞΙΑΣ) may not have been written by Plato (ΠΛΑΤΩΝ). The dialogue discusses whether wealth has value and what the aim of philosophy should be.

First Page:

ERYXIAS

By a Platonic Imitator (see Appendix II)

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

APPENDIX II.

The two dialogues which are translated in the second appendix are not mentioned by Aristotle, or by any early authority, and have no claim to be ascribed to Plato. They are examples of Platonic dialogues to be assigned probably to the second or third generation after Plato, when his writings we...

Cratylus

Cratylus (ΚΡΑΤΥΛΟΣ) discusses whether things have names by mere convention or have true names which can only be correctly applied to the object named and may have originated from God.

First Page:

CRATYLUS

By Plato

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

INTRODUCTION.

The Cratylus has always been a source of perplexity to the student of Plato. While in fancy and humour, and perfection of style and metaphysical originality, this dialogue may be ranked with the best of the Platonic writings, there has been an uncertainty about the motive of the piece, which interpreters h...

The Golden Asse

First Page:

THE GOLDEN ASSE

by Lucius Apuleius "Africanus"

Translated by William Adlington

First published 1566 This version as reprinted from the edition of 1639. The original spelling, capitalisation and punctuation have been retained.

Dedication

To the Right Honourable and Mighty Lord, THOMAS EARLE OF SUSSEX, Viscount Fitzwalter, Lord of Egremont and of Burnell, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Iustice of the forrests and Chases from Trent Southward; Captain of the Gentleman Pensioners of the House of the QUEENE our Soveraigne Lady.<...

The Antiquities of the Jews –by: Flavius Josephus

Antiquities of the Jews was a work published by the important Jewish historian Flavius Josephus about the year 93 or 94. It is a history of the Jewish people, written in Greek for Josephus' gentile patrons. Beginning with the creation of Adam and Eve, it follows the events of the historical books of the Hebrew Bible, but sometimes omits or adds information.

Volume 1 contains Books 1-5 and ends with the dedication of Samuel and death of Eli the priest.

First Page:

THE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS

[1]

By Flavius Josephus

Translated by William Whiston

PREFACE.

1. Those...

Theodoric the Goth

Theodoric the Great (~454-526) was king of the Ostrogoths during the time of the terminal decline of the Western Roman Empire. After wandering with his people through the Balkans, at times allied with the Eastern Empire, and at others, its enemy, he was invited by the Emperor Zeno to invade and conquer Italy on behalf of the Empire. He defeated the Germanic king Odovacar, who had himself deposed the last Emperor of the West, and established the Ostrogothic Kingdom in Italy. He became known as "King of the Goths and Romans in Italy", ruling according to the principle of civilitas. His reign was...

Protagoras –by: Plato (

Jowett, in his always informative introduction, sees this dialogue as transitional between the early and middle dialogues. Socrates meets with Protagoras and other sophists and pursues his inquiry into virtue. The dialectic brings the thinkers to a surprising ending. Socrates narrates this dialogue.

First Page:

PROTAGORAS

By Plato

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

INTRODUCTION.

The Protagoras, like several of the Dialogues of Plato, is put into the mouth of Socrates, who describes a conversation which had taken place between himself and the great Sophist at the ...

Nature Myths and Stories for Little Children –by: Flora J. (Flora Juliette) Cooke

First Page:

NATURE MYTHS AND STORIES FOR LITTLE CHILDREN

by FLORA J. COOKE

Chicago.

A. Flanagan, Publisher.

NATURE MYTHS

AND

STORIES

FOR LITTLE CHILDREN

BY FLORA J. COOKE of the Cook County Normal School Chicago

REVISED EDITION

CHICAGO A. FLANAGAN, PUBLISHER.

COPYRIGHT 1895 BY FLORA J. COOKE.

PREFACE.

Feeling the great need of stories founded upon good literature, which are within the comprehension of little children, I have written the following stories, hoping that they may suggest to prim...

Page 1 of 1212345...10...Last »
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons
2004-2016 thebooksage.com. All Rights Reserved.