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Verses and Translations

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VERSES AND TRANSLATIONS

Contents:

VISIONS. GEMINI AND VIRGO. "THERE STANDS A CITY" STRIKING. VOICES OF THE NIGHT. LINES SUGGESTED BY THE 14TH OF FEBRUARY. A, B, C. TO MRS. GOODCHILD. ODE 'ON A DISTANT PROSPECT' OF MAKING A FORTUNE. ISABEL. DIRGE. LINES SUGGESTED BY THE 14TH OF FEBRUARY. "HIC VIR, HIC EST" BEER. ODE TO TOBACCO. DOVER TO MUNICH. CHARADES. PROVERBIAL PHILOSOPHY. TRANSLATIONS: LYCIDAS. IN MEMORIAM. LAURA MATILDA'S DIRGE. "LEAVES HAVE THEIR TIME TO FALL." "LET US TURN HITHERWARD OUR BARK." CARMEN SAECULARE. TRANSLATIONS FROM HORACE. ...

Charmides

Charmides (Χαρμδη) discusses the virtue of temperance.

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THE DIALOGUES OF PLATO

CHARMIDES

By Plato

Translated into English with Analyses and Introductions By B. Jowett, M.A.

Master of Balliol College Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Oxford Doctor in Theology of the University of Leyden

TO MY FORMER PUPILS

in Balliol College and in the University of Oxford who during fifty years have been the best of friends to me these volumes are inscribed in grateful recognition of their never failing attachment.

The additions and alte...

Republic (version 2) –by: Plato (

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato around 380 BC concerning the definition of justice and the order and character of the just city-state and the just man. It is Plato's best-known work and has proven to be one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of philosophy and political theory. In it, Socrates along with various Athenians and foreigners discuss the meaning of justice and examine whether or not the just man is happier than the unjust man by considering a series of different cities coming into existence "in speech", culminating in a city (Kallipolis...

An Essay on Man –by: Alexander Pope

Pope’s Essay on Man, a masterpiece of concise summary in itself, can fairly be summed up as an optimistic enquiry into mankind’s place in the vast Chain of Being.

Each of the poem’s four Epistles takes a different perspective, presenting Man in relation to the universe, as individual, in society and, finally, tracing his prospects for achieving the goal of happiness.

In choosing stately rhyming couplets to explore his theme, Pope sometimes becomes obscure through compressing his language overmuch. By and large, the work is a triumphant exercise in philosophical poetry, co...

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列子

卷第一 天瑞篇

子列子居鄭圃,四十年人無識者.國君卿大夫視之,猶眾庶也.國不足,將嫁於 衛.弟子曰:「先生往無反期,弟子敢有所謁;先生將何以教?先生不聞壺丘 子林之言乎?」子列子笑曰:「壺子何言哉?雖然,夫子嘗語伯昏瞀人.吾側聞 均A試以告女.其言曰:有生不生,有化不化.不生者能生生,不化者能化化. 生者不能不生,化者不能不化.故常生常化.常生常化者,無時不生,無時不化 .陰陽爾,...

Odysseus, the Hero of Ithaca Adapted from the Third Book of the Primary Schools of Athens, Greece –by: Unknown

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[Frontispiece: ODYSSEUS AS A YOUTH AT HOME WITH HIS MOTHER]

ODYSSEUS THE HERO OF ITHACA

ADAPTED FROM THE THIRD BOOK OF THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS OF ATHENS, GREECE

BY

MARY E. BURT

Author of "Literary Landmarks," "Stories from Plato," "Story of the German Iliad," "The Child Life Reading Study"; Editor of "Little Nature Studies"; Teacher in the John A. Browning School, New York City

AND

ZENA"IDE A. RAGOZIN

Author of "The Story of Chaldea," "The Story of Assyria," "The Story of Media, Babylon, and Persia," "The Story of Vedic India"; Member of t...

Apology –by: Plato

The Apology of Socrates is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he unsuccessfully defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel" (24b). "Apology" here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word "apologia") of speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions (from the Ancient Greek πολογα).

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APOLOGY

By Plato

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

INTRODUCTION.

In what relation the Apology of Plato st...

Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

Silver footed, fair haired Thetis, Ares the God of War, Nike the Goddess of Victory, The Furies and The Muses, Zeus the presiding deity of the Universe and the magical, mysterious Olympus, are some of the amazing, mythical Greek and Roman deities you'll encounter in this book.

Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by EM Berens was originally intended for young readers. Written in an easy and light style, the author attempts to bring the pantheon of gods into a comprehensible format. He organizes them into different dynasties and chronologies to make it easier for th...

Euthydemus

Euthydemus (Εθδημο) and Dionysodorus the sophists discuss the meaning of words with Socrates.

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EUTHYDEMUS

by Plato

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

INTRODUCTION.

The Euthydemus, though apt to be regarded by us only as an elaborate jest, has also a very serious purpose. It may fairly claim to be the oldest treatise on logic; for that science originates in the misunderstandings which necessarily accompany the first efforts of speculation. Several of the fallacies which are satirized in it reappear in the Sophistici Elenchi of Aristotle and are re...

Hellenica –by: Unknown

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HELLENICA

By Xenophon

Translation by H. G. Dakyns

Xenophon the Athenian was born 431 B.C. He was a pupil of Socrates. He marched with the Spartans, and was exiled from Athens. Sparta gave him land and property in Scillus, where he lived for many years before having to move once more, to settle in Corinth. He died in 354 B.C.

The Hellenica is his chronicle of the history of the Hellenes from 411 to 359 B.C., starting as a continuation of Thucydides, and b...

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