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Olympian Nights

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Transcriber's Note: Text that was printed in italics in the original document is shown between underscore characters and the oe ligature is shown as [oe].

[Illustration: BRANCH OFFICE OF MAMMON & CO.]

OLYMPIAN NIGHTS

by

JOHN KENDRICK BANGS

Author of "A House Boat on the Styx" "The Pursuit of the House Boat" "The Enchanted Type writer" Etc. Etc.

[Illustration]<...

Critias –by: Plato (

This is an incomplete dialogue from the late period of Plato's life. Plato most likely created it after Republic and it contains the famous story of Atlantis, that Plato tells with such skill that many have believed the story to be true. Critias, a friend of Socrates, and uncle of Plato was infamous as one of the bloody thirty tyrants.

First Page:

CRITIAS

by Plato

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

INTRODUCTION AND ANALYSIS.

The Critias is a fragment which breaks off in the middle of a sentence. It was designed to be the second part of a trilogy, which, like the other gre...

Works and Days, The Theogony, and The Shield of Heracles


Works and Days provides advice on agrarian matters and personal conduct. The Theogony explains the ancestry of the gods. The Shield of Heracles is the adventure of Heracles accepting an enemy's challenge to fight.

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HESIOD, THE HOMERIC HYMNS, AND HOMERICA

This file contains translations of the following works:

Hesiod: "Works and Days", "The Theogony", fragments of "The Catalogues of Women and the Eoiae", "The Shield of Heracles" (attributed to Hesiod), and fragments of various works attributed to Hesiod.

Homer: "The Homeric Hymns", "The Epigrams of Hom...

Antigone –by: Sophocles

This is the final installment in Sophocles's Theban Plays, following Oedipus Rex and Oedipus at Colonus. Oedipus's daughter Antigone deliberately breaks the laws of Thebes when she buries her brother's body and is sentenced to death. She clashes with Creon, the King of Thebes, over what constitutes justice and morality: the laws of the state or the laws of the individual.

First Page:

SOPHOCLES

OEDIPUS THE KING

Translation by F. Storr, BA Formerly Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge ...

The Mythological Zoo

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The Mythological Zoo

By

Oliver Herford

[Illustration]

New York Charles Scribner's Sons 1912

Copyright, 1912, by Oliver Herford

Published September, 1912

To

Elwyn Barron

With Affectionate Regard

Contents

Page

Medusa 2 The Siren 4 The Dolphin 6 The Cockatrice 8 Cerberus 10 The Sphinx 12 The Sea Serpent 14 The Salamander 16 The Jinn 18 The Mermaid 20 The Unicorn 22 The Satyr 24 The Gar...

L. Annaeus Seneca on Benefits

First Page:

L. ANNAEUS SENECA, ON BENEFITS

By Seneca

Edited by Aubrey Stewart

PREFACE

Seneca, the favourite classic of the early fathers of the church and of the Middle Ages, whom Jerome, Tertullian, and Augustine speak of as "Seneca noster," who was believed to have corresponded with St. Paul, and upon whom [Footnote: On the "De Clementia," an odd subject for the man who burned Servetus alive for differing with him.] Calvin wrote a commentary, seems almost forgotten in modern times. Perhaps some of his popularity may have been due to his being supposed to be ...

The Earthly Paradise

First Page:

THE EARTHLY PARADISE

A POEM.

BY

WILLIAM MORRIS Author of the Life and Death of Jason.

Part II.

ELEVENTH IMPRESSION

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO. 39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON NEW YORK AND BOMBAY 1903

CONTENTS.

PAGE

MAY 2

The Story of Cupid and Psyche 5

The Writing on the Image 98

JUNE 112

The Love of Alcestis 114

The Lady of the Land ...

Alcibiades I –by: Plato (

As Jowett relates in his brilliant introduction, 95% of Plato's writing is certain and his reputation rests soundly on this foundation. The Alcibiades 1 appears to be a short work by Plato with only two characters: Socrates and Alcibiades. This dialogue has little dramatic verisimilitude but centres on the question of what knowledge one needs for political life. Like the early dialogues, the question is on whether the virtues needed by a statesman can be taught, on the importance of self-knowledge as a starting point for any leader. While this may be only partially the work of Plato, or even n...

Letters of Pliny

The largest surviving body of Pliny's work is his Epistulae (Letters), a series of personal missives directed to his friends, associates and the Emperor Trajan. These letters are a unique testimony of Roman administrative history and everyday life in the 1st century CE. Especially noteworthy among the letters are two in which he describes the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in August 79, during which his uncle Pliny the Elder died (65 and 66 in this edition), and one in which he asks the Emperor for instructions regarding official policy concerning Christians (Trajan Letter 97). Other letters inclu...

The Fables of Phaedrus

The fable is a small narrative, in prose or verse, which has as its main characteristic the aim of conveying a moral lesson (the “moral”), implicitly or, more normally, explicitly expressed. Even though the modern concept of fable is that it should have animals or inanimated objects as characters – an idea supported by the works of famous fabulists such as Aesop and La Fontaine – Phaedrus, the most important Latin fabulist, is innovative in his writing. Although many of his fables do depict animals or objects assuming speech, he also has many short stories about men, writing narrati...

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