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The Adventurer

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THE Adventurer

BY C. M. KORNBLUTH

ILLUSTRATED BY FREAS

For every evil under the sun, there's an answer. It may be a simple, direct answer; it may be one that takes years, and seems unrelated to the problem. But there's an answer of a kind....

President Folsom XXIV said petulantly to his Secretary of the Treasury: "Blow me to hell, Bannister, if I understood a single word of that. Why can't I buy the Nicolaides Collection? And don't start with the rediscount and the Series W business again. Just tell me why ."

The Secretary of the Treasury sai...

Forever

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FOREVER

By NED LANG

Of all the irksome, frustrating, maddening discoveries was there no way of keeping it discovered?

Illustrated by DICK FRANCIS

With so much at stake, Charles Dennison should not have been careless. An inventor cannot afford carelessness, particularly when his invention is extremely valuable and obviously patentable. There are too many grasping hands ready to seize what belongs to someone else, too many men who feast upon the creativity of the innocent.

A touch of paranoia would have served Dennison well; but he was lacki...

The Schoolmistress, and other stories

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THE SCHOOLMISTRESS AND OTHER STORIES

By Anton Chekhov

FROM THE TALES OF CHEKHOV, VOLUME 9

CONTENTS

THE SCHOOLMISTRESS A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN MISERY CHAMPAGNE AFTER THE THEATRE A LADY'S STORY IN EXILE THE CATTLE DEALERS SORROW ON OFFICIAL DUTY THE FIRST CLASS PASSENGER A TRAGIC ACTOR A TRANSGRESSION SMALL FRY THE REQUIEM IN THE COACH HOUSE PANIC FEARS THE BET THE HEAD GARDENER'S STORY THE BEAUTIES THE SHOEMAKER AND THE DEVIL

THE SCHOOLMISTRESS

AT half past...

A Modern Cinderella Or, the Little Old Shoe and Other Stories

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A Modern Cinderella

or The Little Old Shoe

And Other Stories

by

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT

CONTENTS

A MODERN CINDERELLA: OR, THE LITTLE OLD SHOE DEBBY'S DEBUT BROTHERS NELLY'S HOSPITAL

A MODERN CINDERELLA

OR,

THE LITTLE OLD SHOE

HOW IT WAS LOST

Among green New England hills stood an ancient house, many gabled, mossy roofed, and quaintly built, but picturesque and pleasant to the eye; for a brook ran babbling through the orchard that encompassed it about, a garden plat stretched upward to the whispering birches on the slope, a...

Indian Fairy Tales –by: Joseph Jacobs

This book is a fine collection of Indian fairy tales, some are folklore, some are from the Jataka tales, and some from panchatantra.

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INDIAN FAIRY TALES

Selected and edited by JOSEPH JACOBS

Illustrated by JOHN D. BATTEN

TO MY DEAR LITTLE PHIL

PREFACE

From the extreme West of the Indo European world, we go this year to the extreme East. From the soft rain and green turf of Gaeldom, we seek the garish sun and arid soil of the Hindoo. In the Land of Ire, the belief in fairies, gnomes, ogres and monsters is all but dead; in the Land of Ind it ...

The Curious Republic of Gondour and Other Whimsical Sketches –by: Mark Twain

As the title reveals, these stories are a collection of some of Mark Twain's more fanciful and eccentric works. They run the gamut from political commentary to our species' need to "be remembered" somehow. Taken as a whole the stories are "whimsical". Taken individually, they speak the truth in different ways. (Introduction by John Greenman)

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THE CURIOUS REPUBLIC OF GONDOUR AND OTHER WHIMSICAL SKETCHES

By Mark Twain

NOTE:

Most of the sketches in this volume were taken from a series the author wrote for The Galaxy from May, 1870, to April, 1871...

The Kenzie Report

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Transcriber's Note:

This etext was produced from If Worlds of Science Fiction May 1953. Extensive research did not uncover any evidence that the U.S. copyright on this publication was renewed.

THE Kenzie REPORT

By Mark Clifton

Illustrated by Kelly Freas

If this story has a moral, it is: "Leave well enough alone." Just look what happened to Kenzie "mad about ants" MacKenzie, who didn't....

...

Red Men and White –by: Owen Wister

These eight stories are made from our Western Frontier as it was in a past as near as yesterday and almost as by-gone as the Revolution; so swiftly do we proceed. They belong to each other in a kinship of life and manners, and a little through the nearer tie of having here and there a character in common. Thus they resemble faintly the separate parts of a whole, and gain, perhaps, something of the invaluable weight of length; and they have been received by my closest friends with suspicion. ...When our national life, our own soil, is so rich in adventures to record, what need is there for one ...
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