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A Lecture On Heads –by: George Alexander Stevens

First Page:

A LECTURE ON HEADS

By Geo. Alex. Stevens

WITH ADDITIONS,

By Mr. Pilon

AS DELIVERED by Mr. Charles Lee Lewes.

TO WHICH IS ADDED, AN ESSAY ON SATIRE.

WITH FORTY SEVEN HEADS By Nesbit, From Designs By Thurston.

1812.

[Transcriber's Note: Numbers in the text within curly brackets are page numbers.]

ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC.

There having been several pirated editions published of this Lecture, it is necessary to describe their nature, and to explain the manner in which they were obtained; from which the public will judge, how much they have been i...

Fifty-One Tales –by: Lord Dunsany

Very brief, well-crafted stories, many having surprise endings, all steeped in the dye of myth and calling to every reader's neglected imagination.

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FIFTY ONE TALES

by Lord Dunsany

1915

CONTENTS

The Assignation

Charon

The Death of Pan

The Sphinx at Giza

The Hen

Wind and Fog

The Raft Builders

The Workman

The Guest

Death and Odysseus

Death and the Orange

The Prayer of the Flower

Time and the Tradesman

The Little City

The Unpasturable Fields

The Worm and the Angel

The Songless Country

The Latest Thing

The Demagogue and ...

Nightmare Abbey –by: Thomas Love Peacock

Deep in the fens of the British coast sits the gloomy mansion that goes by the name Nightmare Abbey. It is inhabited by persons of very low opinion of the human race, and in fact they pride themselves in the depths of their detestation. Others of its denizens believe the ultimate exercise and product of the human mind ought to be chaos.
Now let the young master of the house get snared by the wiles of a beautiful young lady. And for good measure, toss in another beautiful young lady. Now Scythrop (named in honor of an ancestor who became bored with life and hanged himself) is about to ...

Penguin Island –by: Anatole France

An old monk is tricked by the Devil into undertaking a voyage to a remote island to save the souls of thousands who live there. He arrives on the island which is actually a desolate one, inhabited only by colonies of millions of penguins. The old monk whose eyesight and hearing are almost nonexistent, mistakes them for humans and begins baptizing them. In Heaven, God finds Himself in a dilemma; the old monk's unwavering faith compels him to regard the baptisms as genuine.

However, in Christian theology, only humans have souls – hence God is forced to grant the thousands of newly...

The Ghost of Chatham; A Vision Dedicated to the House of Peers –by: Anonymous

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THE GHOST OF CHATHAM; A VISION.

DEDICATED TO THE HOUSE OF PEERS.

"Now a thing was secretly brought to me, and mine ear received a little thereof. A SPIRIT passed before my face." Job.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR WILLIAM HONE, 45, LUDGATE HILL.

1821.

Sixpence.

J. M'Creery, Tooks Court, Chancery Lane, London.

PREFACE.

The following lines were written under the powerful impulse of feelings which appear to have been almost consentaneous with those of the whole British people. The...

Green Carnation –by: Robert Smythe Hichens

The Green Carnation, first published anonymously in 1894, was a scandalous novel by Robert Hichens whose lead characters are closely based on Oscar Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas - also known as 'Bosie', whom the author personally knew. It was an instant succès de scandale on both sides of the Atlantic. The book features the characters of 'Esmé Amarinth' (Wilde), and 'Lord Reginald (Reggie) Hastings' (Douglas). The words put in the mouths of the hero and his young friend in the story are mostly gathered from the sayings of their originals. Robert Hichens spent nearly a year "in the company of...

Moonbeams from the Larger Lunacy –by: Stephen Leacock

Humorous, ironic, and sometimes cynical observations of life in 1915 from Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock.

First Page:

PREFACE

The prudent husbandman, after having taken from his field all the straw that is there, rakes it over with a wooden rake and gets as much again. The wise child, after the lemonade jug is empty, takes the lemons from the bottom of it and squeezes them into a still larger brew. So does the sagacious author, after having sold his material to the magazines and been paid for it, clap it into book covers and give it another squeeze. But in the prese...

The Way of All Flesh –by: Samuel Butler

The Way of All Flesh (1903) is a semi-autobiographical novel by Samuel Butler which attacks Victorian-era hypocrisy. Written between 1873 and 1884, it traces four generations of the Pontifex family. It represents the diminishment of religious outlook from a Calvinistic approach, which is presented as harsh. Butler dared not publish it during his lifetime, but when it was published it was accepted as part of the general revulsion against Victorianism.

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THE WAY OF ALL FLESH

"We know that all things work together for good to them that love God." ROM. viii. 28

...

Northanger Abbey –by: Jane Austen

Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey is a book about the life of Catherine Morland and her romantic relationships. The novel is divided into two parts; the first part begins with Catherine’s visit to Bath and her relationship with Henry Tilney and the other people she met there, and the second part starts with the arrival of Frederick Tilney and her visit to Northanger Abbey.

This book alongside Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility is considered one of the major works of Jane Austen. The novel had undergone many revisions before its publication and it wa...

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